Ecclesiates 9:10
Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest.

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Community Farm...

Some of the Animals on our Prayer List!

CANADIAN HORSE HISTORY ~ "HERITAGE AND HEART"

The Canadian Horse or Le Cheval Canadien originated from horses sent to Quebec by King Louis XIV in the late 1600's. These horses, the best from the King's stable, were of French Norman, Breton, Arab, Andalusian and Spanish Barb descent.

Under conditions of hard use, sparse feed, and extreme weather conditions, the Canadian eventually developed into the easy keeping and hardy animals that they are today. It is said that the Canadian is capable of generating "more power per hundred pounds of body weight than horses of any other breed." Traits such as these earned the Canadian their nickname "The Little Iron Horse".

One of the few breeds to be developed and granted breed status in Canada, the Canadian Horse registry and stud book was first formed in 1886. The Canadian Horse Breed Registry is now administered by the Canadian Livestock Records Corporation.

The Canadian Horse was influential in developing other North American horse breeds such as the Morgan, Tennessee Walker, Missouri Fox Trotter, Standardbred, and the Saddlebred.

STATUS
In the mid 1800's the Canadian Horse numbered more than 150,000. Due to the desire for larger draft breeds, and the advent of farm machinery, their numbers dwindled throughout the 1900's. By the early 1970's there were only approximately 400 left in existence. At this time, the peril of the breed was recognized, and a concerted effort was made by diligent breeders to bring the Canadian back from the verge of extinction. The breed has slowly grown to the point where there are now about 4000 in existence. Since they are rapidly gaining in popularity, the demand tends to far exceed the availability of these still rare horses.

CHARACTERISTICS
The Canadian Horse typically stands 14-16hh. Most commonly black, they may also be chestnut, brown or bay.

They are recognizable by their finely chiselled heads, arched necks, and long, thick, and often wavy tails and manes. They have sturdy legs with good bone, and have exceptionally hard, strong feet. They are renowned for their kind, sociable natures, intelligence and willingness to please.

USES
Good natured and truly versatile, the Canadian can be found doing almost any type of equine discipline. Perhaps best known for their driving ability, Canadian Horses have won many prestigious driving awards including the 1987 North American Pleasure Driving Championship, the 1991 Grand Champion Whip at the Canadian Carriage Driving Classic, the Presentation Award at the 1997 Pairs Driving Championship, the Limit Preliminary Division at the 1997 High Country CDE, the 1998 Preliminary Single Division at Gladstone, and the 1998 Advanced Single Horse Championship at Fair Hill.

Their calmness, hard working nature and people oriented personality makes the Canadian Horse ideal for use in the tourism industry. They can be found working at Upper Canada Village, African Lion Safari, Black Creek Pioneer Village, Ross Farm Museum, Fortress of Louisbourg, Colonial Williamsburg, Heritage Park, and the Cardston Remington Carriage Museum. Canadians are also used by the Montreal Mounted Police, Calgary City Police, and can be found pulling the Caleches of Montreal and Quebec City.

Whatever the interest...Dressage, Hunter Jumper, Eventing, Endurance, Trail, Packing, Ranch Work, Mounted Patrol, Logging, Carriage Driving, Combined Driving, Wagon Rides.....There's a Canadian for Everyone!

A flock of Canadian Chantecler Chickens
an endangered species!

This breed remains quite rare, with only about a 1000 birds in existence, all being maintained only by small farms with an interest in the preservation of heritage breeds.

Just as with the Canadian Horse, both types (white and Partridge) of this rare poultry breed were also developed in Canada and thus are uniquely adapted to our climatic conditions.

The original Chantecler, white in color, was created in the early 1900’s by a monk named Brother Wilfrid, who lived in Oka QC. He made the realization that there was no Canadian breed of chicken and decided to remedy this. He critically reviewed other chicken breeds available at that time and noted in which aspects that they were superior in, and which they were inferior, and basically came up with all of the characteristics of his "ideal". He then took the next decade to make a whole series of systematic crosses, eventually coming up with his "ideal" - the White Chantecler.

This unique and very attractive dual purpose chicken breed, declared a “heritage” breed of QC by their parliament, is little known by the rest of Canada. The Chantecler chicken is noted as having critical status by the American Livestock Conservancy as well as by the Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities, and endangered by Rare Breeds Canada.

It is important to note that even though they carry the same name, the Partridge Chantecler and the White Chantecler are in effect, separate and distinct breeds, and accordingly must be maintained separately to ensure they remain as such!

The Partridge Chantecler was developed approximately 30 years after the White Chantecler, by Dr J E Wilkinson of Edmonton AB. Just as Brother Wilfrid made a series of crosses to come up with his "ideal", so did Dr Wilkinson. Ultimately he came up with a bird that he called the "Albertan". It is important to note that they actually had nothing at all to do with Brother Wilfrid's White Chanteclers and that they were essentially completely different breeds. However when Dr Wilkinson submitted his "Partridge Albertan" birds for recognition by the American Poultry Association, they did accept them but then rather arbitrarily renamed them as a Partridge Chantecler, much to his huge disappointment!

Ridley Bronze Turkey

This strain of Bronze turkey is from Canada. It does not get as big as the Broad Breasted Bronze but it can reproduce naturally and can reach a size of 25 to 30 lbs for toms and 12 to 14 lbs for hens.

Geese

Canadienne Cows an endangered species

Canadienne cattle arrived in Quebec between 1608 and 1660. This was the first cattle breed to be developed in North America, primarily from animals imported from Normandy and Brittany. This stock was blended on this continent and selected for hardiness and productivity in the New World. The Canadienne breed dominated until the beginning of the 19th century. Later, the breed was threatened by the introduction of larger sized British stock, before being taken in hand in 1883 by a small group of concerned breeders who formed the Canadienne Cattle Breeders Association. The Canadienne breed is still mainly found in the province of Quebec.

The Canadienne is recognized for her hardiness and adaptability to inhospitable soils and climates. Born pale, the coat becomes black, brown, tawny or reddish-brown with a paler muzzle, side, and udder or scrotum. Cows weigh 1000 -1100 pounds, are long-lived and have a docile temperament. The meat tends to be lean, and the light bone results in a high dressing percentage. Their milk is also in demand for cheese production.

ALPACAS

Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) is a domesticated species of South American camelid. It resembles a small llama in appearance.

Alpacas are kept in herds that graze on the level heights of the Andes of southern Peru, northern Bolivia, Ecuador, and northern Chile at an altitude of 3,500 m (11,500 ft) to 5,000 m (16,000 ft) above sea-level, throughout the year. Alpacas are considerably smaller than llamas, and unlike llamas, alpacas were not bred to be beasts of burden but were bred specifically for their fiber. Alpaca fiber is used for making knitted and woven items, much as wool is. These items include blankets, sweaters, hats, gloves, scarves, a wide variety of textiles and ponchos in South America, and sweaters, socks, coats and bedding in other parts of the world. The fiber comes in more than 52 natural colors as classified in Peru, 12 as classified in Australia and 16 as classified in the United States.

In the textile industry, "alpaca" primarily refers to the hair of Peruvian alpacas, but more broadly it refers to a style of fabric originally made from alpaca hair but now often made from similar fibers, such as mohair, Icelandic sheep wool, or even high-quality English wool. In trade, distinctions are made between alpacas and the several styles of mohair and luster.

Llamas

Llama

Llama

Spinning Wheel

Weaving Loom

Percheron Draft Horses

The Canadian Pig - Lacombe Hogs

Lacombe pigs represent the first livestock breed developed in Canada, a hybrid of Landrace, Berkshire and Chester White. Developed at the Agriculture Canada RESEARCH STATION in Lacombe, Alberta, the breed was first licensed in 1957. Pigs are all white with drooping ears. They have a slightly heavier bone structure and are a bit fatter than the Landrace. The breed is not as popular as in the past and Rare Breeds Canada has raised concerns about low numbers in the national pig population.

Under Construction

BEES

Under Construction

We will also be building a 12' x 32' Hoop Greenhouse...
as well as a new Chicken Coop and Barn.